Price Of A Jersey Cow

 The breed was known in England as early as 1771 and was regarded very favorably because of its milk and butterfat production. At that early date, the cattle of Jersey Island were commonly referred to as Alderney cattle although the cattle of this island were later referred to only as Jerseys. Jersey cattle were brought to the United States in the 1850”s. Jersey is the second most popular breed of cattle in the world. Originating from Jersey in the Channel Islands, Jersey cattle are renowned for their versatility as well as their high quality milk that can be used in the production of a wide range of dairy products. Offering a viable dairy business solution, Jersey cattle have all of the qualities needed to compete at a commercial level.

Description

The Jersey breed originated on the Island of Jersey, a small British island in the English Channel off the coast of France. The Jersey is one of the oldest dairy breeds, having been reported by authorities as being purebred for nearly six centuries. Jersey cattle are a small breed of dairy cattle. Originally bred in the Channel Island of Jersey, the breed is popular for the high butterfat content of its milk and the lower maintenance costs attending its lower bodyweight, as well as its genial disposition. The Jersey cow is quite small ranging from only 400a 500 kilograms (880a 1,100 lb). The main factor contributing to the popularity of the breed has been their greater economy of production, due to:

The ability to carry a larger number of effective milking cows per unit area due to lower body weight, hence lower maintenance requirements, and superior grazing ability.
Calving ease and a relatively lower rate of dystocia, leading to their popularity in crossbreeding with other dairy and even beef breeds to reduce calving related injuries.
High fertility

Characteristics

The Jersey cow ranges from 400 to 500 kilograms (880 to 1,100 lb). Factors contributing to the popularity of the breed have been their greater economy of production, due to: The ability to carry a larger number of effective milking cows per unit area due to lower body weight, hence lower maintenance requirements, and superior grazing ability Calving ease and a relatively lower rate of dystocia, leading to their popularity in crossbreeding with other dairy and even beef breeds to reduce calving related injuries

High fertility High butterfat (4.84%) and protein (3.95%), and the ability to thrive on locally produced feed Jerseys occur in all shades of brown, from light tan to almost black. They are frequently fawn in colour. All purebred Jerseys have a lighter band around their muzzles, a dark switch (long hair on the end of the tail), and black hooves, although in recent years, colour regulations have been relaxed to allow a broadening of the gene pool

The cows are calm and docile; bulls may be unpredictable or aggressive Jersey cattle have a greater tendency towards postparturient hypocalcaemia (or “milk fever”) in dams, and tend to have frail calves that require more attentive management in cold weather than other dairy breeds due to their smaller body size (which results in an increased surface area-to-mass ratio, increasing heat loss

Features

Jersey, breed of small short-horned dairy cattle originating on Jersey, one of the Channel Islands; it is believed to have descended from French cattle. The colour of the Jersey is usually a shade of fawn or cream, but darker shades are common. In the late 18th century measures were passed prohibiting the importation of cattle into Jersey except for immediate slaughter, and by the early 19th century the indigenous breed came to be recognized as pure. Jersey cattle have been introduced in large numbers into England, one of the earliest herds being formed in 1811. The first exportation of registered Jerseys to the United States was in 1850.

The Jersey is adaptable to a wide range of conditions, and its distribution is worldwide. Jersey milk is remarkably rich in butterfat, and for that reason animals of this breed are in demand for crossing with native stock to improve the butterfat percentage in milk. Jerseys are of great importance where butter is a major product, as in New Zealand and Denmark. Because of their small size and lack of muscular development as well as the yellow colour of body fat, Jerseys have lower beef value than the other major breeds. Their principal capacity lies in their efficient production of milk high in butterfat and milk solids.

Price Of A Jersey Cow

$800.00 – $2,400.00

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