Pomeranian Dog Price

Descended from large sled dog breeds, the now-tiny Pomeranian has a long and interesting history. The foxy-faced dog, nicknamed “the little dog who thinks he can,” is compact, active, and capable of competing in agility and obedience or simply being a family friend. Even though these are purebred dogs, you may find them in the care of shelters or rescue groups. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if you want to bring a dog home. Poms may be small, but they don’t always act that way and may even challenge larger dogs. While they make for good apartment pets, they can also bark a lot, which your neighbors may not be too thrilled about. But as long as you give your dog plenty of exercise and playtime, keep them out of hot weather, and give them lots of love and attention, you’ll have a loving, adorable, furry family companion!

Description

The Pomeranian (often known as a Pom or Pom Pom) is a breed of dog of the Spitz type, named for the Pomerania region in Central Europe (today part of northern Poland and eastern Germany). Classed as a toy dog breed because of its small size, the Pomeranian is descended from the larger Spitz type dogs, specifically the German Spitz. It has been determined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale to be part of the German Spitz breed, and in many countries, they are known as the Zwergspitz (Dwarf Spitz).
The breed has been made popular by a number of royal owners since the 18th century.

Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian and consequently the smaller variety became universally popular. During Queen Victoria’s lifetime alone, the size of the breed decreased by 50%. Overall, the Pomeranian is a sturdy, healthy dog. The most common health issue is Luxating patella. Tracheal collapse can also be an issue. More rarely, the breed can suffer from a skin condition colloquially known as “black skin disease”, or Alopecia X. This is a genetic disease which causes the dog’s skin to turn black and lose all or most of its hair. The breed is currently among the top 15 most popular in the USA, and the current fashion for small dogs has increased their popularity worldwide.

Features of Pomeranian Dog

  • HealthPomeranians are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they’re prone to certain health conditions. Not all Poms will get any or all of these diseases, but it’s important to be aware of them if you’re considering this breed.If you’re buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. In Poms, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).
    • Allergies: Some Pomeranians can suffer from a variety of allergies, ranging from contact allergies to food allergies. If your Pomeranian is licking his paws or rubbing his face a great deal, suspect that he has an allergy and have him checked by your vet.
    • Epilepsy: Some Pomeranians develop epilepsy and have seizures. If your Pom has seizures, take him to the vet to determine what treatment is appropriate.
    • Eye Problems: Pomeranians are prone to a variety of eye problems, including cataracts, dry eye (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) (dryness of the cornea and the conjunctiva), and tear duct problems. These problems can appear in young adult dogs and may lead to blindness if untreated. Contact your vet if you notice any redness, scarring, or excessive tearing.
    • Hip Dysplasia: Hip dysplasia occurs occasionally in Pomeranians. Many factors, including genetics, environment and diet, are thought to contribute to this deformity of the hip joint. Affected Pomeranians usually are able to lead normal, healthy lives, unlike some of the large and giant breeds, who require surgery to get around easily.
    • Legg-Perthes Disease: This is another disease involving the hip joint. Many toy breeds are prone to this condition. When your Pomeranian has Legg-Perthes, the blood supply to the head of the femur (the large rear leg bone) is decreased and the head of the femur that connects to the pelvis begins to disintegrate. Usually, the first signs of Legg-Perthes occur when puppies are 4 to 6 months old. The first signs are limping and atrophy of the leg muscle. Qualified vets can perform a surgery to cut off the diseased femur so that it isn’t attached to the pelvis any longer. The scar tissue that results from the surgery creates a “false joint” and the puppy is usually pain free.
    • Patellar Luxation: This is a very common problem for Poms. The patella is the kneecap. Luxation means dislocation of an anatomical part (as a bone at a joint). Patellar luxation is when the knee joint (often of a hind leg) slides in and out of place, causing pain. This can be crippling, but many dogs lead relatively normal lives with this condition.
    • Collapsed Trachea: This is a condition in which the trachea, which carries air to the lungs, tends to collapse easily. The most common sign of a collapsed trachea is a chronic, dry, harsh cough that many describe as being similar to a “goose honk.” Since it can be caused by pulling too hard against a collar while walking, you should train your Pom to walk nicely beside you instead of pulling at the leash, or use a harness instead of a collar. Collapsed trachea can be treated medically or surgically.
    • Dental Problems: Poms are prone to teeth and gum problems and early tooth loss. Watch for dental problems and take your Pom to the vet for regular dental exams.

Prices of Pomeranian Dog

 $600.00 – $2,000.00

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