Parvo Vaccine

spreads through direct contact with an infected dog or by indirect contact with a contaminated object. Your puppy is exposed to the parvovirus every time he sniffs, licks, or consumes infected feces. Indirect transmission occurs when a person who has recently been exposed to an infected dog touches your puppy, or when a puppy encounters a contaminated object, like a food or water bowl, collars and leashes, and the hands and clothing of people who handle infected dogs.

The Merck Veterinary Manual classifies the virus as a disease of the stomach and small intestines, as this is where the virus does the most damage. The virus prefers to infect the small intestine, where it destroys cells, impairs absorption, and disrupts the gut barrier. Parvo in puppies also affects the bone marrow and lymphopoietic tissues, and in some cases can also affect the heart.

Description

Parvo is a highly contagious virus that affects all dogs, but unvaccinated dogs and puppies less than four months of age are at the most risk to contract it. The virus attacks the gastrointestinal system and creates a loss of appetite, vomiting, fever, and often severe, bloody diarrhea. Extreme dehydration can come on rapidly and kill a dog within 48-to-72 hours, so prompt veterinary attention is crucial. There is no cure, so keeping the dog hydrated and controlling the secondary symptoms can keep him going until his immune system beats the illness.

Canine parvovirus (commonly called parvo) is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness in puppies and dogs. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces. Puppies, adolescent dogs, and adult dogs who are not vaccinated are at risk of contracting the virus. Protecting your puppy or dog from parvovirus could save his or her life.

Features of Parvo Vaccine

Canine parvovirus is a highly contagious virus that can affect all dogs, but unvaccinated dogs and puppies younger than four months old are the most at risk. Dogs that are ill from canine parvovirus infection are often said to have “parvo.” The virus affects dogs’ gastrointestinal tracts and is spread by direct dog-to-dog contact and contact with contaminated feces (stool), environments, or people. The virus can also contaminate kennel surfaces, food and water bowls, collars and leashes, and the hands and clothing of people who handle infected dogs. It is resistant to heat, cold, humidity, and drying, and can survive in the environment for long periods of time. Even trace amounts of feces from an infected dog may harbor the virus and infect other dogs that come into the infected environment. The virus is readily transmitted from place to place on the hair or feet of dogs or via contaminated cages, shoes, or other objects.

Parvo is an infectious DNA virus that commonly causes severe illness in young and unvaccinated dogs. It primarily affects the rapidly dividing cells of the body, meaning that the intestinal tract and bone marrow are the worst affected. Although parvovirus is most common in puppies and adolescent dogs, it can affect adult or senior dogs, especially if they are unvaccinated.

Prevention

Dogs and puppies can be vaccinated against parvovirus from the age of six weeks. A puppy should have their first vaccine at six to eight weeks old. They will then need a second vaccine two weeks later. After that, they will need a booster vaccine at one year old. After this, dogs need a booster vaccination yearly or less often, as advised by your vet. This is all that is needed to prevent your dog catching this fatal disease.

Vaccination for parvovirus is routine and is one of the three main diseases that dogs are normally vaccinated against. Your dog should be given a vaccination card with the date of the jab and the date the next shot is due. This will be signed by your vet or registered veterinary nurse (RVN). Boosters are important for dogs to keep up to date with, but the time between these varies so check with your vet to see how often your dog should be vaccinated.

Benefits of Parvo Vaccine

Vets and pet owners used to believe that ‘more is better’ when it came to vaccines. But there are very real dangers associated with vaccination and over-vaccination. Not to mention, vaccination doesn’t always result in the outcome we are looking for. In fact, data from the Virbac Disease Watchdog shows that 28% of vaccinated puppies and 11% of vaccinated adults still get parvo.

Now, you may be asking …  “How is that possible? Isn’t that why I’m supposed to get my puppy the parvovirus vaccine?” There are many reasons vaccines fail, the most common reason being maternal antibodies. 

Prices of Parvo Vaccine

$30.00 – $90.00

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