If you’ve ever seen a video of a cat that’s terrified, you know how distressing it can be to watch. It’s important to understand that cats are naturally skittish and anxious animals, so it’s no wonder some of them suffer from anxiety. If your kitty is showing signs of being stressed or scared, these over-the-counter medications may help her feel more at ease.

Anxiety is one of the most common mental health issues in cats, and it can lead to a variety of behavioral problems. While many cases of anxiety in cats can be managed with a combination of behavior modification, exercise, and anti-anxiety medication, there are some cats who require long-term use of prescription drugs.

If your cat has been prescribed a long-term medication for his anxiety, it’s important to give him the correct dosage and frequency as prescribed by your veterinarian. These medications have side effects that may be harmful if given incorrectly, so follow the directions carefully.

When your cat is anxious, her body releases excess adrenaline, which makes her heart beat faster, her muscles tense up, and her blood pressure rise.

Your cat’s anxiety can be caused by a number of factors. For example, your cat may feel anxious if she is experiencing pain or discomfort. She may also become anxious when you are away from home for an extended period of time. Your cat may even become anxious after giving birth to her kittens and begin to exhibit signs of separation anxiety.

Although there are many reasons why cats may develop an anxious behavior pattern, one thing that is certain about these animals is that they are sensitive creatures who respond to their surroundings in unique ways. In some cases, these behaviors can be quite extreme, causing them to scratch excessively or hide under furniture during stressful situations.

It could be because she’s scared of something like a trip to the vet or a visit from the in-laws.

While it’s important to note that there are a lot of reasons why cats can be anxious, the most common causes include:

  • A new pet or person in the house
  • Moving to a new home
  • Being separated from their family for any period of time

These are all situations your cat might find stressful. If you’re worried about her anxiety, take her to the vet for an exam and talk about your concerns.

Anxiety can also be the result of illness or pain.

  • Anxiety can also be the result of illness or pain. If your cat is showing signs of anxiety, it could be due to an underlying medical condition that needs to be treated.
  • Cats with anxiety sometimes have a painful conditions such as osteoarthritis or feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD). These illnesses can cause pain, which in turn causes your pet to become anxious.
  • Some cats may show signs of anxiety after being treated for another illness, such as kidney disease or heart disease. This is because they likely had a high level of stress during their treatment period and afterward, which caused their bodies to release stress hormones into the bloodstream over time, and those hormones are still present even after treatment is finished

You may see symptoms like pacing, trembling, or growling.

Your cat’s anxiety may be related to a change in routine. It’s common for cats to be anxious about being in a new environment, such as when you move your feline friend into your new house or apartment. Your cat may also become anxious about going on a trip to the vet. Anxiety over these changes is normal and should fade with time, but some pets will need help from their owners until they get used to the new living situation.

Other causes of anxiety include changes in your pet’s routine or schedule, or even yours For example, if you start working more hours than usual each week and leave your kitty alone more often than usual, she may become stressed out by this change in her schedule (and perhaps even yours). This can lead her to exhibit symptoms like pacing, trembling, or growling as she tries not only to cope with feelings of stress but also to communicate them through actions such as meowing excessively at you while you’re away at work all day long instead of just sleeping next door.

To relieve anxiety, try these over-the-counter medications.

  • If you’re looking to give your cat a natural treatment, try some over-the-counter medications.
  • Talk with your vet before giving your cat any kind of medication. Medications should be given only as recommended by a veterinarian trained in the care of animals, and it’s best to discuss any new medication with them before administering it.

Valerian capsules are an herbal supplement that may relieve anxiety and promote sleep in cats.

Valerian capsules are an herbal supplement that may relieve anxiety and promote sleep in cats. They are available over the counter at most health food stores, but you should talk to your veterinarian before giving them to your cat.

The recommended dose for valerian is 250-500 mg per day for up to 4 weeks. If you’re using this herbal remedy as to a treatment for anxiety, give it to your kitty every night before bedtime until the symptoms improve or go away completely. If you’re using it as a sleep aid, give it every night before bedtime until you see positive results (such as long stretches of restful sleep).

If these supplements don’t work for your pet, talk with your vet about alternative options because there could be something else going on here

Another option is melatonin supplements.

Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the pineal gland, which is located deep in the brain. The retina also produces melatonin as well. Melatonin levels rise and fall with day and night cycles, which is why it’s often called the “sleep hormone.”

In humans, melatonin supplements are used to improve sleep quality and aid in managing jet lag and other sleep disorders such as insomnia or restless leg syndrome (RLS). In cats, studies indicate that melatonin may help reduce anxiety-related behavior including vocalization and inappropriate urination/defecation when left alone at home or at night when sleeping environments change due to life changes such as moving into new homes or introducing new pets into households where they had previously been alone with their owners.

Melatonin is a hormone found naturally in humans and animals that regulates sleep patterns.

Melatonin is a hormone found naturally in humans and animals that regulates sleep patterns. It’s produced by the pineal gland, which is located at the base of your cat’s brain. Cats produce melatonin at night, peaking between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. when they’re most active. Melatonin production decreases when it’s light out, causing cats to sleep more during these hours.

Cats typically don’t have problems with their circadian rhythm until their early teens—when they’re still adjusting from being kittens into full-grown cats—but some older cats may experience difficulty sleeping as well.

But before you give your cat any medication, talk with your veterinarian about possible risks and side effects.

Before you give your cat any medication, talk with your veterinarian about possible risks and side effects. Your vet will be able to give you advice on the best medication for your cat.

Always check with your vet before giving your cat any kind of medication.

  • Always check with your vet before giving your cat any kind of medication. Cats have different metabolisms than humans, and they can have different reactions to medications than humans or dogs.
  • Make sure you’re buying the right medication for your cat’s breed, size and age.
  • Cats can also have slightly different reactions to medications than other cats—so it’s important that you keep an eye on them while they are taking their medicine!
  • Some pets react badly when given over-the-counter anxiety meds from a veterinarian because they were not prescribed specifically for them by a professional.

Conclusion

Over-the-counter anxiety medications are a safe, effective way to help your cat feel less stressed. It’s always best to talk with a veterinarian before giving your cat any kind of medication, though. They can help you understand what might be causing the anxiety and find the treatment that’s right for your feline friend.

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