Wild rabbits are a common sight in the United States, from the grassy plains of Texas to the black sand beaches of Hawaii. But how long do wild rabbits live? The answer is a little complicated. The length of time a wild rabbit life depends on several factors. A wild African Pygmy rabbit, for example, only has an average life expectancy of three years in captivity, according to The Cottontail Rabbit Organization. On the other hand, a jackrabbit can live as long as 12 years if it avoids predators and disease.

Wild rabbits live in a variety of environments, but they are most commonly found in forests and prairies. They are also commonly found near farms and gardens. The most common wild rabbit species can be found throughout the world.

The lifespan of wild rabbits varies depending on the species and environmental conditions. In general, wild rabbits live 1-3 years in captivity. In the wild, however, their lifespan is likely to be much shorter as many die from predation or starvation during their first year of life.

Most wild rabbits live less than one year according to the University of Florida.

The average lifespan of a wild rabbit is less than one year, according to the University of Florida. Most wild rabbits die within six months, but some live as long as two years. They also have a high mortality rate in their first year of life and are susceptible to many predators, including humans and dogs.

The top three causes of death in wild rabbits are starvation, predators, and diseases.

The top three causes of death in wild rabbits are starvation, predators, and diseases.

  • Starvation is the most common cause of death in wild rabbits. When food is scarce, a rabbit will eat more than it needs to survive, which leads to obesity and eventually starvation.
  • Predatory animals such as foxes, hawks, and coyotes are another major threat to the lives of wild rabbits. These predators hunt for food or for sport; however, they can also prey on your pet rabbit if you have one as a pet.
  • Diseases such as myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease can also be fatal if left untreated by an experienced veterinarian who knows how to treat these illnesses properly (http://www.vetmedicinehealthblog/an-introduction-to-myxomatosis/).

A wild rabbit’s lifespan depends largely on the environment it lives in.

In the wild, rabbits are more likely to live longer than in captivity.

A wild rabbit’s lifespan depends largely on the environment it lives in. Wild rabbits will typically live longer in a natural environment than they will in an artificial one. They also tend to live longer when they are safe from predators or other threats and when they have access to adequate food resources and water.

A young rabbit can be on its own as early as 1 month old

The age at which a rabbit can be considered an adult varies by breed. Typically, however, a young rabbit is able to fend for itself as early as 1 month old. It may also be able to breed as early as 6 months old or even 1 month old in some cases; however, breeding is typically not recommended until the rabbit has reached 3 months of age.

Wild rabbits are more likely to live longer than pet rabbits because of the type of food they eat.

Wild rabbits are more likely to live longer than pet rabbits because of the type of food they eat. Wild rabbits eat a diet that closely resembles their natural habitat’s vegetation, while pet rabbits are fed commercial rabbit pellets and vegetables. Rabbits are herbivores who naturally eat grasses, herbs, bark and twigs in the wild; this is not the case with pets which may be fed very different food sources depending on what their owners give them.

Rabbits, cottontails especially, can live up to 7 years in captivity, but average around two years old.

Rabbits, cottontails especially, can live up to 7 years in captivity but average around two years old. Rabbits in the wild are known to live to 5 or 6 years of age on average.

When a wild cottontail is attacked by a predator, it will not produce another litter that year.

If a wild cottontail is attacked by a predator, it will not produce another litter that year. In fact, the rabbit will not be able to reproduce for at least a year due to the stress caused by an attack and/or eating less food in order to survive or heal from wounds sustained during the attack.

If a young rabbit survives its first year or two, it has done quite well!

If a young rabbit survives its first year or two, it has done quite well! Although wild rabbits are more likely to be killed by predators than any other cause of death (including starvation), they can live for 5-10 years under good conditions if left unmolested.

  • Rabbits are prey animals, meaning that their survival depends on avoiding being eaten by other animals. They cannot fight back if attacked, nor can they outrun many predators like coyotes and foxes.
  • Rabbits are dependent upon temperature regulation: If the air is too hot or cold, they will die from exposure within minutes (without fur coats). They also require a constant supply of clean water at all times to drink; in the wild this means either finding an existing source such as a riverbank or spring-fed creek bed where there isn’t much mud around, or digging a hole deep enough so that only their noses touch dirt while drinking from it.

Conclusion

Hopefully, you now understand a little more about the life cycle of wild rabbits. It’s amazing that so many of these adorable little creatures die so young, but it’s not all bad news. As we said before, if a young rabbit survives its first year or two, it has done quite well. For those lucky few who make it past this point in their lives, there are many more years of happy hopping ahead. And hopefully by now you’ve learned how to keep your rabbit safe from predators and disease as well.

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