Goat Pneumonia Vaccine

The goal of vaccination is to stimulate an immune response that provides some level of protection from disease. Unfortunately, most vaccines do not achieve complete protection from infection and subsequent disease. Vaccines are expected to reduce the severity of disease in infected animals or limit the frequency of disease in the herd. Many factors, including nutrition, stresses, and the general health of animals, can influence the effectiveness of vaccination. Vaccines should be administered according to label directions and only to systemically healthy animals.

Consult your veterinarian for guidance when designing and implementing a herd vaccination program. Vaccines should not be expected to eliminate all disease problems and should be considered only as a tool to be used with other management strategies to mitigate the occurrence and impacts of infectious diseases. Vaccination protocols should be minimally aimed toward the prevention of diseases in your herd and should be developed in consultation with your local veterinarian.

Description

The vaccine commonly known as “CDT” or “CD&T” is a vaccination for Clostridium perfringens type C + D and tetanus. This is the vaccine that everyone raising goats should use. The label directions should be followed closely, including those for handling and storage. Several companies make CDT vaccines and some of those include vaccines for additional clostridial diseases. Consult with your veterinarian to determine if those other diseases are common in your area or are on your farm before spending the extra money for the multiple combination vaccines.

Does should be vaccinated for CDT approximately 30 days prior to giving birth to provide protection to the kids through the first milk, or colostrum. If the doe has not been given a priming booster of two shots adminstered three to four weeks apart at some time in her life, the pre-kidding annual shot will not really be effective. This priming set of shots is usually given when the doe is a young kid but can be done at any age. Kids should be vaccinated at 5 to 6 weeks of age and then given a booster three to four weeks later. Vaccination of kids from properly vaccinated does prior to 5 weeks of age may result in kids that are not protected and annual boosters may be ineffective.

Features of Goat Pneumonia Vaccine

The relatively low economic value of small ruminants places constraints upon vaccination in these species. In general, vaccination against clostridial diseases such as enterotoxemia and tetanus are most important. Enzootic pneumonia is a major cause of losses in intensively housed sheep. Footrot is a difficult disease to control because of the extreme antigenic diversity of its causal agent. In some areas soremouth vaccination is important. Bluetongue vaccination, even though complex, is also essential in some areas. Peste de petits ruminants is a growing cause for concern over much of Africa. Goats and llamas generally require the same vaccines as sheep.

For vaccination of healthy cattle, sheep and goats against pasteurellosis caused by the micro-organisms named. Inject 2 ml SQ. Administer a 2nd dose at 2 to 4 weeks. Animals vaccinated at less than 3 months of age should be revaccinated at weaning or at 4 to 6 months of age.

Administration

As in other food animals, the veterinarian should be aware of the potential of injected vaccines to induce injection site lesions including blemishes in show animals. Reaction sites that require trimming at slaughter may result in a significant financial penalty. In general, subcutaneous injection in the caudolateral neck region is preferred, with an injection behind the elbow over the ribs as a possible alternative. Do not administer vaccines over the loin or hindquarters where the valuable meat cuts are located. As always, animals must be properly restrained to minimize struggling and to ensure proper delivery of the full dose of vaccine. The use of excessively long needles over 0.5 inches long should be avoided and they should be changed often. Remember, the needle used to withdraw vaccine from the bottle should not be used for injection.

Prices of Goat Pneumonia Vaccine

$7.19 to $26.99

Sharing is caring!

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

error: Content is protected !!