Elephant ear plants can add an exotic look to a garden, but they are not cold-hardy in most regions and must be dug up and stored over winter. The elephant ear plant is a large-leafed tropical perennial that can grow 6 to 10 feet tall. A perennial in warm climates, elephant ears die back to the ground when temperatures drop below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. In colder zones, plant elephant ears as annuals and dig up the bulbs before frost arrives. Plant elephant ears in rich, well-drained soil in partial shade or full sun. Cut back foliage once it becomes discolored in the fall, then lift the bulbs with a shovel. Store the bulbs in a cool location like a garage or basement until spring. Replant them at the same depth as they were growing previously when all danger of frost has passed in spring.

Elephant ear plants are one of the easiest houseplants to grow. They have thick, stiff leaves that can grow up to three feet long, and they’re also known as caladiums. Elephant ears are often grown outdoors in warm climates, but they do well indoors too. There are several ways to propagate elephant ears, including from seed, cuttings, and from divisions.

Elephant ear plants can add an exotic look to a garden, but they are not cold-hardy in most regions and must be dug up and stored over winter.

Elephant ear plants can add an exotic look to a garden, but they are not cold hardy in most regions and must be dug up and stored over winter.

Elephant ears are temperate perennials that need a warm climate to thrive. In milder climates, elephant ears will grow year-round, but if your weather is too cool or dry during the summer months, you may need to bring them indoors.

The elephant ear plant is a large-leafed tropical perennial that can grow 6 to 10 feet tall.

The elephant ear plant is a large-leafed tropical perennial that can grow 6 to 10 feet tall. Because it is not cold and hardy in most regions, the plant must be dug up and stored over winter before new growth emerges in spring. However, in warmer climates where this plant thrives, it is considered a perennial and will die back to the ground when temperatures drop below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius).

A perennial in warm climates, elephant ears die back to the ground when temperatures drop below 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Plant elephant ears in rich, well-drained soil in partial shade or full sun.
  • Plant them in the spring, but not too early. The best time to plant elephant ear bulbs is right after there has been a frost and the ground temperature has reached 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Elephant ears can be planted outside as soon as you can work the soil and dig up your flower beds.
  • Don’t plant them in the fall. Elephant ears will die back to the ground when temperatures drop below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, so don’t plant them until springtime
  • Plant them in late summer, but not too late! You should never put your bulb on its side when planting it into your garden bed because this could cause rot of its roots and stunt its growth for years to come (not to mention kill it).

In colder zones, plant elephant ears as annuals and dig up the bulbs before frost arrives.

Plant elephant ears in the fall, and you will have flowers blooming in spring. Plant them in spring, and you’ll have blooms during summer (a great time to plant). Planting in summer means that your elephant ears should be blooming by fall. And if you’re planting now for a winter show of flowers, your bulbs should start to grow soon.

Plant elephant ears in rich, well-drained soil in partial shade or full sun.

Plant elephant ears in rich, well-drained soil in partial shade or full sun. Elephant ears are not as tolerant of compacted soil as some other plants, so make sure to loosen up the soil before planting.

Elephant ear bulbs can be grown from seed and will produce a small plant that looks like an elephant ear bulb before it grows into one. In late spring when the weather is warm enough to transplant them (generally between May and June), plant your new elephant ear bulbs about 2 inches deep in moist soil with good drainage and plenty of sunshine (or at least five hours of direct sunlight per day). Water regularly until all danger of frost has passed; once this happens, you should water less frequently than you did throughout the summer months.

To encourage flowering, fertilize with a slow-release fertilizer every 1 to 2 months during both spring and fall while they’re growing actively; add more fertilizer after you’ve dug up your plants over winter just before replanting them again next year.

Cut back foliage once it becomes discolored in the fall, then lift the bulbs with a shovel.

As the weather cools, you will want to cut back any dead or diseased foliage. Do not try to save any of the bulbs; they are difficult to clean and can harbor disease, which would be harmful if planted in your garden.

Once you have decided to remove the bulbs, dig them up using a shovel or trowel. You may find it helpful to place newspaper on top of the soil before removing them so that dirt doesn’t fall into storage containers or other areas around your house. Once removed from their beds, wash each bulb thoroughly with water before storing them in a cool location until spring planting time (ideally 40 degrees F).

Store the bulbs in a cool location like a garage or basement until spring.

Store the bulbs in a cool location like a garage or basement until spring.

  • Make sure that you store them in a dry location, because if they are too damp, the bulb will rot.
  • They should also be kept in a dark place, so as to avoid rotting and molding. This is especially important since elephant ears grow best when planted outdoors during the summer months (when it’s light out all day), but indoors through the winter (when it’s dark).
  • It is best not to store them in an area that is too humid because this could cause fungus and rotting to occur more quickly than desired.

Replant them at the same depth as they were growing previously when all danger of frost has passed in spring.

Plant elephant ears in rich, well-drained soil in partial shade or full sun. They prefer acid conditions and do not like to be overwatered, so they are great plants for those who have poor drainage. Planting depth is important: if you plant too deep, they’ll rot; if you plant too shallow, they won’t grow.

It’s best to transplant elephant ears as soon as possible after purchasing them—within two weeks at the latest. Elephant ear bulbs should be planted about one inch below the surface of the soil with their roots facing down (not up). Transplanting is best done during spring when all danger of frost has passed and temperatures remain above 50 degrees F., but don“t worry about transplanting later than six months before your area “s first frost date in autumn because most elephant ear varieties are hardy enough to survive winter temperatures down into the 20s F..

Elephant ear plants can add an exotic look to a garden, but they are not cold hardy in most regions and must be dug up and stored over winter

The elephant ear is not cold hardy in most regions and must be dug up and stored over winter. Elephant ears can be planted in the spring, but it’s more common to plant them in late summer or early fall for a fall/winter display.

In order to grow well, elephant ears need rich, well-drained soil that is slightly acidic (pH 5.5-6.5). They should be planted in partial shade or full sun, full sun will produce larger leaves than partial shade does! Elephant ears can also be cut back in the fall after their first year of growth if you want to control their height or limit their width.

Conclusion

Elephant ear plants can add an exotic look to a garden, but they are not cold hardy in most regions and must be dug up and stored over winter.

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