Distemper Parvo Vaccine

The DHPP vaccination is commonly referred to as a distemper or a distemper-parvo vaccine. It does protect against those two potentially fatal viral infections, but it covers much more. Canine distemper is a contagious viral infection that attacks a dog’s respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological systems. The parvo virus mainly targets the gastrointestinal tract resulting in vomiting and bloody diarrhea. It also suppresses the patient’s immune system and unfortunately, can even affect the heart. The hepatitis virus most commonly damages the liver, but it can also affect the kidneys, spleen and/or lungs. The last component of this combination vaccine is the parainfluenza virus. This is a respiratory infection that is spread rapidly between dogs.

This is a core vaccination that is needed by all dogs. Without protection, dogs will die from these viral infections. Puppies can be started on this vaccine by 6 weeks of age. They should then receive a high titer low passage booster every 3-4 weeks until they are approximately 16 weeks old. The use of a high titer low passage DHPP vaccine will assist a puppy’s immune system in developing protection at a younger age then DHPP vaccines which are not high titer low passage. It is critical to vaccinate puppies on the appropriate time table. Once a properly vaccinated puppy reaches adulthood, they should receive boosters every 1-3 years as determined by a veterinarian. Adult dogs whose vaccine status is unknown (stray, shelter obtained, etc) should receive a series of 2 vaccines, 2-4 weeks apart, to ensure that they are adequately immunized.

Description

Canine distemper is a highly contagious, often fatal disease caused by a virus that attacks the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and the nervous systems. Contact among recently infected animals maintains the virus in a population, and a constant supply of puppies helps to provide a susceptible population for infection. Although immunity to virulent canine distemper is prolonged or lifelong, it is not as absolute after vaccination. Dogs that do not receive periodic immunizations may lose their protection and become infected after stress, immunosuppression, or contact with diseased animals.

Going to the vet repeatedly over several months for vaccinations, and then for boosters or titers throughout your dog’s life, may seem like an inconvenience, but the diseases that vaccinations will shield our pets from are dangerous, potentially deadly, and, thankfully, mostly preventable. We read about so many different vaccinations, for so many different illnesses, that it can sometimes be confusing to know which vaccinations puppies need and which ones are important but optional. Here is an overview of the diseases that vaccinations will help your pet to avoid.

Features of Distemper Parvo Vaccine

While commonly called canine distemper vaccination, this vaccine typically protects your pet against more than just distemper. That’s because it is actually a combination of vaccines in one injection that will protect your pet from several serious diseases. Canine distemper is considered a core vaccine. This means that, because canine distemper is a serious, highly contagious disease with a high death rate, organized veterinary medicine has determined that all dogs should be protected from this disease.

The exact combination of your dog’s distemper combination vaccine depends on your dog’s age and individual disease-risk profile, but in general, the most important diseases to protect against are canine distemper, canine adenovirus-2 infection (hepatitis and respiratory disease), canine parvovirus infection, and parainfluenza. The abbreviation for this combination vaccine is frequently written as “DHPPV,” “DHPP,” “DA2PP,” or “DA2PPV” on your pet’s health records. The letters in these abbreviations are defined as follows:

  • D = Canine distemper virus. Infection with this virus is serious, with a death rate approaching 50% in untreated dogs. The virus attacks the respiratory, digestive, and brain/nervous systems of dogs.
  • H = Hepatitis. Since this vaccine protects against canine adenovirus-2 and adenovirus-1, it is often referred to as A2. Canine adenovirus-1 causes canine infectious hepatitis, a serious disease that affects the liver.
  • Canine adenovirus-2 causes respiratory disease and is one of the infectious agents commonly associated with canine infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as kennel cough.
  • A2 = Canine adenovirus-2. This virus causes a respiratory disease in dogs (see above).
  • P = Parvovirus. Infection with this virus is highly contagious and serious, with a death rate approaching 90% in untreated dogs. The virus attacks the digestive and immune systems of unvaccinated animals, causing debilitating diarrhea and vomiting.
  • P = Parainfluenza. This is a mild respiratory viral disease in dogs. V = Virus.

Prices of Distemper Parvo Vaccine

$16.00 – $45.00

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