Broad Spectrum Antibiotics For Goats

Three groups of goats naturally infected with PPR virus (10, 7 and 24) were treated symptomatically. Broad spectrum antibiotics (chloramphenicol 10 ml/kg body wt, penicillin 10 000 IU/kg, streptomycin 10 mg/kg, each given i/m for 5 days), intestinal sedatives (Entero Sediv, 20 ml/kg for 4 days orally) and fluid therapy (Pedialyte, 30 ml/kg, for 4 days s/c) were used to treat pneumonia, diarrhoea and restore body fluid ionic balance. Scrubbing the labial scabs with lemon [sour orange] fruit (Citrus aurantium) cut in half resulted in earlier healing than spraying with an iodine/antibiotic mixture. By combining the lemon fruit treatment of mouth scabs with antibiotics and chemotherapy, 20 of 34 goats (58.8%) recovered, whereas of 7 treated with iodine/antibiotics instead of sour orange fruit, 3 (42.8%) recovered.

Description

Even though they’re becoming more and more popular, goats are not a common farm animal in North America. For this reason, there aren’t a lot of medicines that are made specifically for goats.

Development and testing of goat medicine can often cost more than is justified due to the small number of goats, so most medications that are used to treat these animals are known as “off label” or “extra label”, whether they are over the counter or prescription. These medications are not government approved, but this doesn’t mean that they are not safe for you to use on your animals

Uses/benefits of Broad Spectrum Antibiotics For Goats

  • Food Safety:  Not a medically important antibiotic in human medicine; Unique in livestock
  • Bacterial resistance development:  Lower risk
  • No cross-resistance  with Macrolide and other antibiotics 
  • Fast Acting: Achieves Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) in plasma and lungs within 30 minutes and 2 hours, respectively – to address bacteria doubling in numbers every 30 minutes
  • Single daily intramuscular injection of 1 mℓ per 15kg bodymass for 3 consecutive days
  • Bacteriocidal activity buys time for the immune-compromised animal to cure itself
  • Improved syringability:  Efficient removal of entire content – no remaining left-overs wasted
  • CLAS® vial  allows for lighter and lower bulk packaging waste, lower risk for breakage
  • Meat withdrawal 37 days in sheep after the last treatment

Features of Broad Spectrum Antibiotics For Goats

Even though they’re becoming more and more popular, goats are not a common farm animal in North America. For this reason, there aren’t a lot of medicines that are made specifically for goats. Development and testing of goat medicine can often cost more than is justified due to the small number of goats, so most medications that are used to treat these animals are known as “off label” or “extra label”, whether they are over the counter or prescription. These medications are not government approved, but this doesn’t mean that they are not safe for you to use on your animals. One of the biggest problems you will likely find with goat health care is that there aren’t a lot of veterinarians who specialize in goats, or who know much about goats at all. It is a good idea to find a mentor who is already an experienced goat farmer and has the knowledge you need to raise healthy animals.

Once you find someone who has the knowledge and experience to help you with your own goats, stick with that person. Going online to forums or to contact other goat farmers will only get confusing in the long run. Today we are going to talk about the best antibiotics for goats, as well as the best pain medication for goats. Some of the latter goat medicines are actually treatments that are made for human consumption, but can work with many types of animals, including goats.

Composition:

Trimethoprim 4 % m/v, sulphamethoxazole 20 % m/v.

Dosage and directions for use :

Sulmetrim Plus NF should be administered intramuscularly or intravenously in cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, horses, cats and dogs.

The recommended dosage in all species is 1 ml / 10 kg body mass per day for 3 – 5 days. The total daily dose should be administered in two equally divided doses. Injection sites should be alternated.

Withdrawal Period :

Do not slaughter cattle and pigs for human consumption within 7 days of last treatment.

Do not slaughter sheep, goats and horses for human consumption within 14 days of last treatment.

Milk from treated cows must not be used for human consumption within 3 days of last treatment.

Milk from treated sheep and goats must not be used for human consumption within 5 days of treatment.

Prices of Broad Spectrum Antibiotics For Goats

$13.99 – $59.00

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