8 Way Vaccine For Goats

It is generally advised that all goats be vaccinated against overeating disease (enteroxemia) and tetanus. Both of these diseases are caused by clostridial bacteria present in animals and the environment. Goats kept on marginal pastures and/or not fed grain may be at much lower risk for overeating disease, but they are susceptible to tetanus. Vaccines used for these diseases usually provide protection for both diseases. These combination vaccines simplify herd preventive health programs and decrease costs.

There are many diseases for which sheep and goats can be vaccinated, but there is only one universally-recommended vaccine, and it is for the clostridial diseases that commonly affect small ruminants. Clostridial diseases are fatal diseases that strike ruminant livestock suddenly, often causing death before any clinical signs are seen. Clostridia  (bacteria) are widespread in the environment. They are normally found in the soil and feces. They are also present in the digestive tract and tissues of healthy animals. For these reasons, vaccination is the best way to prevent disease outbreaks.

Description

Two clostridial vaccines are commonly used in sheep and goats: a 3-way vaccine called CDT; and an 8-way vaccine with the trade name  Covexin®-8. CDT protects healthy sheep and goats against clostridium perfringins type C and D (overeating disease) and clostridium tetani (tetanus). Covexin®-8 protects against these same diseases, plus several additional clostridial diseases, including blackleg. The 3-way vaccine is probably all that’s needed on most sheep and goat farms..

Pregnant ewes and does should be vaccinated with the CDT (toxoid) during their last month of pregnancy, but at least two weeks before they are due to lamb/kid. First-time moms should be vaccinated twice in late pregnancy, 3 and 6 weeks before parturition. Rams, bucks, and wethers should receive an annual booster for CDT.

Features of 8 Way Vaccine For Goats

There are several vaccines available for clostridial disease. A product labeled for goats is recommended. In case of any problems, you are always in a better position if the product is labeled for your specific use.

  1. C-D-T or 3-way vaccines: Clostridium perfringens Types C and D +Tetanus Toxoid in one vaccine. Choose one labeled for goats.
  2. Multivalent clostridial vaccine (such as 8-way vaccine)

One example of a multivalent product is Covexin 8, which has a sheep label. This product protects the animal for clostridial diseases other than enterotoxemia and tetanus. Although blackleg and malignant edema are common and costly infections in sheep and cattle, they are uncommon in goats. Producers sometimes have reported more adverse reactions with the use of a product like this. A multivalent product may be preferable in herds which have had problems with other clostridial diseases such as blackleg and malignant edema (gas gangrene).

Direction for use

As in other food animals, the veterinarian should be aware of the potential of injected vaccines to induce injection site lesions including blemishes in show animals. Reaction sites that require trimming at slaughter may result in a significant financial penalty. In general, subcutaneous injection in the caudolateral neck region is preferred, with an injection behind the elbow over the ribs as a possible alternative. Do not administer vaccines over the loin or hindquarters where the valuable meat cuts are located. As always, animals must be properly restrained to minimize struggling and to ensure proper delivery of the full dose of vaccine. The use of excessively long needles over 0.5 inches long should be avoided and they should be changed often. Remember, the needle used to withdraw vaccine from the bottle should not be used for injection.

Dosage and adminoistration

CDT injections are given subcutaneously (SQ or subQ) under the skin. A needle length of about 1”, gauge of 18 to 20, and the “tent” method is used. The loose skin is pulled up in the area of the injection site. The syringe and needle are held parallel to the body and the needle is pushed through the skin to administer the vaccine into the cavity created.

The dosage for CDT is 2ml for adults or kids. It’s not uncommon for an abscess to develop at a CDT injection site. Therefore,  the armpit (region behind the base of the front legs) is often the preferred site for CDT vaccinations. Always use a new needle to vaccinate each goat to prevent disease. CDT vaccines should be stored in the refrigerator.

Prices of 8 Way Vaccine For Goats

$33.69-$142.11

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